Monthly Archives: July 2018

Radical Candor

Radical Candor is Kim Scott’s approach to becoming a great leader by empowering your team.

It’s a simple exhortation, encourage people to greatness by Caring Personally and Challenging Directly. As with most simple things, it’s not necessarily easy to achieve.

The book is generally well structured, covering the philosophy first, breaking it down into what ‘Caring Personally’ and ‘Challenging Directly’ mean, and what happens when you miss on one or both of the axes (Ruinous Empathy, Manipulative Insincerity and Obnoxious Aggression).

It’s only a hundred or so pages for this first section, but that is pretty small print, so do beware when pacing your reading!

The second section is built around techniques, from how to elicit feedback and build that culture of sharing, to how to host and structure great meetings. It covers building trust, working in teams and how to inspire growth in all types of team members.

There will be sections that resonate more or less deeply with you, depending on what the culture of your organisation is, where your experience and preferences lie, and the current realm of influence you have available to you.

For me, some of the ideas about the purposes of meetings, how to structure them and where they fall on the Listen / Decide / Execute cycle were very useful, especially around being explicit when you are moving between the Debate and Decision phases.

Even if all you take from this book is that it’s important to think about what motivates your people, how you can help them grow and how you can make them happier and more engaged, then it will have been worth reading.

If you can open yourself up to understanding and valuing the difference in others, then that truly gives you a chance to be a great and motivational leader.

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Architecture Qualifications

I was recently asked about Software Architecture qualifications by a reader to the blog, and I’m keen to share my advice a bit more widely.

They are an experienced developer, looking to take a step away from being an individual contributor, to become a design and system implementation influencer. They wanted to know my thoughts about TOGAF, and how useful the qualification had been in my own progression.

My advice assumes that you’ve already decided that a certification or formal course of study is the right way for you to go on your next learning step. If you are a proponent of the 70/20/10 model, then this is very much covering what you should do with your 10% time. So, without further ado, let’s get into the nitty-gritty of the possible options.

TOGAF was an interesting course of study, but I really feel it’s got a very narrow range of applications. I believe it’s only relevant for a very small number of extremely large organisations. It’s main focus was around the creation and maintenance of a large architecture practice in an enterprise, which is well away from the day to day of designing and developing systems.

If you are looking at a progression path from individual contributor to technical leader, then I’d strongly advise your favourite flavour of cloud certifications. I use AWS at the moment, and there’s a Solutions Architect track that’s really good. There are similar Microsoft paths for Azure, or Google ones for their cloud.

ITIL is possibly a useful direction, but that does tend more to hardware and processes, so might be less useful if you are aiming to design and create new systems, as opposed to running existing systems stably and efficiently.

If you are thinking modern companies, strong agile approaches and staying close to the day-to-day implementation of your designs, then the Cloud route is my number 1 suggestion, and there’s a lot of great supporting courses out there to aid your studies!